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Cadence prosthetic and pedal for amputee cyclists

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Posted in Concept, Road, Student Design.

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8 Responses

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  1. Ross Nicholson says

    MIT should grab this guy for their prosthetics lab! Great thinking!

  2. D. says

    Kind of creepy to post a photoshopped picture of T. Martin.

  3. Kennedy C. Fawcett says

    Where can I obtain such a bicycle Prosthesis?

    • Aaron Dunford says

      Depending on where you are in the world, I would love to try and help. Please let me know if you are interested.

  4. Aaron Dunford says

    This design inspired me to build a similar prosthetic for a client of mine. Here is a link to some photos. For more info please feel free to contact me through my web site, http://www.fusionpeak.com.au http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.168560919941554.35908.100003629401511&type=1

  5. Lisa Andrews says

    Is the Cadence available for purchase? I am in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.

Continuing the Discussion

  1. VP-Medical News » Blog Archive » Cadence prosthetic and pedal for amputee cyclists | Bicycle Design linked to this post on September 9, 2011

    [...] For more information about cycling with a prosthetic leg, check out Amputee in Action (based here in Greenville, SC). The site points out that, according to the Amputee Coalition of America, “there are approximately 1.7 million people living with limb loss” and “one out of every 200 people in the U.S. has had an amputation.” If a product like Seth’s can help a percentage of those people to experience the joy of cycling, it is certainly worthwhile. via bicycledesign.net [...]

  2. That’s your leg? But that’s not fair! | Nature Interrupted linked to this post on April 8, 2012

    [...] Inspired Prosthetic Leg. Some are award-winning designs already in at least limited use like the Cadence Prosthetic Leg for cyclists and Tillmann Beuscher’s affordable leg for victims of landmines. Others are pure [...]



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