Related Posts

63 Comments

  1. E February 18, 2011 at 1:42 pm -  Reply

    Could a handcrank be installed on a standard mountain bike?

  2. E February 18, 2011 at 1:47 pm -  Reply

    How difficult would it be to attach a hand crank to a regular mountain bike to make it a front and rear drive bike?
    In other words is it possible to install a hand crank on the handle bar to convert an upright mountain bike to a two wheel drive machine?

    • Marius Hjelmervik February 18, 2011 at 6:22 pm -  Reply

      Well, i would guess it is possible. Most roadgoing handbikes have drive on the single front wheel. That is also the same principle used on wheelchair handbike attachments

    • Matt February 20, 2011 at 11:31 am -  Reply

      @ E I’m not a designer, but just from messing around with bikes I’d guess it would be easy to mount, but very difficult to control – on most mountain bikes, enough of your balance/weight is on the front wheel that you need both hands for control on anything but flat, smooth terrain. You could put the handcrank up even higher but then your hands are even further from the wheel – again leading to twitchy handling. You’d probably want to start with a more upright design (like a hybrid or omafiets/dutch bike) since those put much less weight on the front.

    • Mark Drake February 13, 2012 at 1:26 am -  Reply

      You Bet, You got the money I’ve got the design. I have a dual drive in my shop. Can build you an adapter to your mountain bike. facebook-HandBike America

  3. Easy Tiger February 21, 2011 at 12:51 am -  Reply

    The rear suspension pivot point is in the completely wrong place. The thing would stink-bug with every pedal stroke.

    • art February 22, 2011 at 2:35 pm -  Reply

      Not to mention the RD probably doesn’t have enough throw to suck up the change in chain length as this goes over bumps.

      • Marius Hjelmervik February 22, 2011 at 2:49 pm -  Reply

        The RD HAS enough throw to suck it up. It only lenghtens the chain by 50mm, but its not really an issue, as the povit point WILL get lowered if a prototype is made.

    • Marius Hjelmervik February 22, 2011 at 2:48 pm -  Reply

      That is true, but it looks good ;-P (I am, of course, aware of this issue…)

    • Mark Drake February 12, 2012 at 11:34 am -  Reply

      That is why you use a lock out shock in off position when climbing.

  4. Joe February 23, 2011 at 1:55 am -  Reply

    The real question is not the RD problem but could you or would you take it off road?

  5. Robbo April 7, 2011 at 4:52 am -  Reply

    I have a 2 wheeler handcycle which we made and it works

  6. Aaron April 28, 2011 at 3:36 am -  Reply

    Awesome bike! I have a Top End Force R and it is a nice racing bike but i live in the country with alot of gravel roads. When could it go on the market?

  7. Roger Bergeron May 31, 2011 at 10:59 am -  Reply

    Yes when could it go on the market? We live on Vancouver Island Canada. My girldfriend could use a well design bike like this.

    • Marius Hjelmervik May 31, 2011 at 3:56 pm -  Reply

      Aaron and Roger, thank you very much for the positive feedback guys. Unfortunatly the producer I had an agreement with, decided to pull out in the last minute due to “financial issues”. I will try to find somone else to help me out, but I cannot promise anythin at this point.

      • carrie December 1, 2011 at 4:46 pm -  Reply

        I would really like a bike like this too. I think it would sell well, I could go biking with my son…..try some US manufacturer, like Quickie or Coulors maybe Top End….

        • Scott December 2, 2011 at 10:52 am -  Reply

          @Carrie, keep an eye on a Colorado-based company called ReActive Adaptations (http://www.reactiveadaptations.com). They’ve got a bike with a similar recumbent rear-wheel drive design… and are building me one as we speak.

  8. Aaron May 31, 2011 at 7:36 pm -  Reply

    Alright Marius, Thats to bad I hope you stick to it and dont give up. Its the first comfortable looking off road Ive seen that you dont lay on your chest to pedal. I live in Minnesota, U.S. And hope to see this on the market. Nice work, good luck.

  9. Mark Drake June 23, 2011 at 1:51 am -  Reply

    An adjustable BB on a pivot would be nice. A lower BB would give the rider a better position, mechanical and physical advantage. Great concept especially the projected weight.

  10. Marc June 29, 2011 at 5:08 am -  Reply

    Looks great , Light weight compared to other off roaders and more comfortable looking, hope this goes into production ! Great design :-). I have a force R but would love a bike to go off road

    • Chris Peterson June 29, 2011 at 9:33 am -  Reply

      Looks nice Marius,

      I am moving in the direction to make a offroad handcycle and would be interested in making a prototype for you. Perhaps a joint venture.

      Chris

      • marius hjelmervik June 29, 2011 at 11:34 am -  Reply

        Hey Chris,

        I would be very interested in getting further with this project. Please contact me on marius(a)hjelmervik.dk and we can discuss the venture further.

        Marius

  11. Mark Drake June 29, 2011 at 2:02 pm -  Reply

    I have an investor interested in this design. Colorado based

    • Marius Hjelmervik July 9, 2011 at 11:14 am -  Reply

      Hi again Mark. This sounds interesting. I am currently in dialogue with Chris Peterson, but please send me a mail on marius(a)hjelmervik.dk with more information.

      Marius

  12. Jake O’Connor September 22, 2011 at 1:01 am -  Reply

    Hi Marius – The renderings looks great. I’ve been working on my prototypes for over a year now. There’s a lot to think about in terms of drive train, seating position, suspension and much more. Looks like you have a good start.

    • Marius Hjelmervik December 19, 2011 at 6:16 am -  Reply

      Hi Jake. I have followed the progress on your bike, and it looks very cool. I hope to get my own on the market soon, as I am currently working on my own prototype, but as you mention, there is a lot to do and making a bike on a computer, and one in real life, is far from the same. The prototype is coming along nicely though, and as I said, I hope it will hit the market soon. (P.S. thank you again for the input during the making of this school project :-) )

  13. Mick Hart December 6, 2011 at 4:24 pm -  Reply

    Hi Marius, I’ve spent a lot of time off road using a Varna ll handcycle. Works quite well until you come to gravelly hills,then lack of traction from the front drive wheel becomes an issue.

    I look with interest at your creation, with its rear wheel drive it looks as though it would resolve that issue. Hope you get the bike lauch up and running.

    Mick

    • Marius Hjelmervik December 19, 2011 at 6:19 am -  Reply

      Hi Mick. Thank you for the interest. As i just posted above, I hope, and work towards, getting it on the marked soon. I cannot promise anything regarding launch date when/if the deal I am working on gets trough, but with a working prototype, I am at least one huge step closer. Stay tuned :-)

  14. JinHwalKim December 18, 2011 at 2:07 am -  Reply

    Hi Marius.
    It is south Korea here.
    It is the cycle that I look for..
    It is a cycle to just match the Korean topography.
    When does it release it.?
    May I make it directly.?
    Can it purchase it in prototype.?
    best regard.

    • Marius Hjelmervik December 19, 2011 at 6:25 am -  Reply

      Hi mate. I’m very glad to see the interest for my design extends all the way to Korea. I cannot give you a release date yet, as there still is some paperwork to be done before the contract I am working on gets settled, but I am getting there, and I hope to get the prototype done and tuned by the end of 2011.

  15. Pana February 12, 2012 at 10:29 am -  Reply

    Can one buy the Forzer off road hand to bike?

    • Marius Hjelmervik February 12, 2012 at 3:36 pm -  Reply

      Hey Pana. I am currently working on getting it on the market. More info will come when I have a deal up and running.

  16. Jeff April 1, 2012 at 2:25 pm -  Reply

    Hey Marius, any further luck with the prototype? I would buy one tomorrow! What’s the ETA looking like for getting out to the public? Jeff

    • Marius Hjemervik July 30, 2012 at 3:05 am -  Reply

      Hi Jeff, Sorry for my late reply.
      The prototype is getting along nicely. I did a long trip on it a few weeks ago. My original production partner seems to have dropped out, as I have not heard from him for many months, so I am currently looking for a new investor/partner for manufacturing. I am doing everything I can in order to get this on the market!

  17. Jim Chapman May 8, 2012 at 10:31 am -  Reply

    Hello Marius, Great looking design. I am interested and would buy one today. Any time frame as to when they will be available? Jim

    • Marius Hjemervik July 30, 2012 at 3:08 am -  Reply

      Hi Jim.
      Thanks for the nice comments!
      As I told Jeff above, I am still working on it, to get it on the market. The interest in the project has been overwhelming, and I will do all in my power to get it realized, soon rather than later.

  18. Hernando Rodriguez Garzon May 26, 2012 at 3:31 pm -  Reply

    Lo felicito por su diseño del triciclo Forzer.Quiero saber si estaria dispuesto a venderme los planos para poder fabricarlos en mi pais Colombia S.A. Es el prototipo preciso para nuestros terrenos.

    • Marius Hjemervik July 30, 2012 at 3:11 am -  Reply

      Hola Hernando,
      Gracias por tu post.
      No hablar o escribir español, por lo que se traduce google.
      Cuando la moto se pone en el mercado, tengo la intención de que sea disponible a nivel mundial.

      Hey Hernando,
      Thank you for your post.
      I do not speak or write spanish, so this is google translate.
      When the bike gets on the market, I plan to make it available worldwide.

  19. Andrew July 29, 2012 at 4:43 am -  Reply

    Any updates about the availability?
    I love the simplicity and the fact that your legs remain straight the whole time your cycling – great for anyone whose legs spasm alot and shake around!
    Also the fact that you can strap our torso to the seat – great for anyone with limited balance/lower limb mobility!
    Drop me an email with any updates on the availability!
    Cheers!

    • Marius Hjemervik July 30, 2012 at 3:14 am -  Reply

      Hi Andrew,
      Im glad you like it. I spendt every day for over 6 months on the design itself to make it as user friendly and “clever” as possible, so to hear you like it makes me glad. I do not have your e-mail adress, but feel free to drop me a line on marius@hjelmervik.dk and I will keep you updated.

  20. Hernando Rodriguez Garzon July 29, 2012 at 8:58 pm -  Reply

    felicitaciones,siga persistiendo que es una muy interezante idea y un proyecto bastante necesario.

  21. Milverton September 20, 2012 at 2:39 pm -  Reply

    Dear Sir,
    I have a disabled brother and I would love for him to join me biking. We would love to have one of this kind of hand-cycle bikes for him to develop his back and hand muscles. I would like to know, how much is such bikes and do you deliver up to the Philippines? Thanks

  22. Denis November 25, 2012 at 4:59 am -  Reply

    Hi Marius,

    what about your project to sell this offroad handcycle ?
    it looks great, simply genius ! and what about the price ,
    i live in french alps, so it would be a good iopportnunity to test it !
    Denis

  23. Richard Engram April 21, 2013 at 5:37 pm -  Reply

    Is this bike on the market yet. Most posts are from 2011. Looking for something like this.

  24. Robbo April 23, 2013 at 5:13 am -  Reply

    Not sure if this one is on the market but its not an original design as such. Reactive Adaptions make a recumbent mountain handbike. M5 and Greenspeed have been making handcycles like this for years.

  25. Marius Hjelmervik April 23, 2013 at 6:20 am -  Reply

    Hey guys. Thanks for the kind words and the interest! I am still working on getting it on the market, but it has proven not to be as straight forward as I had hoped. I am now in dialogue with a individual that seems to be very interested, and professional, so I have high hopes. The design has also developed quite a bit since this article was posted. I have made a prototype and based on that, I have made changes that hopefully will making it even better, more stable and lighter. I am now closer than ever. That being said, there is still a lot to be sorted before it is production ready.

  26. Ludovic May 13, 2013 at 10:41 am -  Reply

    J’adore le design du FORZER, mais est-il possible d’adapter ce tadpole pour un non-handicapé, c’est à dire rendre l’utilisation du pédalier et à la place des manivelles, une sorte de guidon.Actuellement sur le marché, les “tricycle” sont trop légèrement amorti, ou en 4 roues.

    • Marius Hjelmervik August 13, 2013 at 9:00 am -  Reply

      Hi Jin,

      First of all, my design does not ignore your patent, as my front setup does not include tilting the frame (like your patent does). I use a regular dual wishbone setup combined with Ackermanns steering geometry, and there is no way you can patent that, as it has been around since 1758.

      On a side note, I don’t even use this setup any more, as prototypes and tests has shown me it is not ideal for this type of trike.

      Good luck with your handbike though Jin. I wish you all the best and we need more bikes like this on the market!

  27. jinhwal kim August 14, 2013 at 7:33 am -  Reply

    Did not yet completed?
    Do you wonder a lot it is to manufacture demand is not many?
    Non-commercial personal use (Handicapped only ..) If you own work Is there going to open?
    I have a lower body disability is polio.
    On the market, even if the price is reasonable I hope.

  28. Loïc Boutin September 24, 2013 at 10:07 pm -  Reply

    For most of us moving from one place to the other is natural and is quite easy. But, for someone with any kind of disability, may it be weakness in the knees due to aging, missing a limb or even paraplegia I believe it can become much more of a challenge. As a fourth year student in Industrial Design myself, I am interested in developing an improved hand bike for my final project. I admire what you’re doing and I think that your hand bike is great work. Moreover, I really think that you were able to make a bike that is visually pleasing and modern! Great job! Unfortunately with the few images I have access to on this web page and because I am unaware of all your research I must ask myself: is the design of this bike really optimal? I would like to point out a few important issues that I feel might not have been considered in your research which could help you with your design. Perhaps your feedback will help me advance in my concept as well.
    First of all, I would like to point out something you probably already know which is the fact that everyone is different. This means that the disabilities people have may vary greatly. I recently received some input from a young woman who does hand biking and who is paralysed very high from the waist down. This in turn resulted in a scoliosis. She had to be operated because of the pain and now although everything is fine she cannot curve her back or turn her trunk from side to side at all. When she uses her bike she has to lay down almost at the horizontal. So, she has to be able to adjust the bench of her bike in consequence and lower the backrest as much as possible. For that reason the seat of your bike should be highly customizable so it can respond to a wider group of clients. In the case of this young woman I do not believe she would be able to use the bike I see in these pictures.
    Secondly, I want to point out the fact that people might buy your bike but not use it for what it was intended. What I think I understand is that this bike is a mountain hand bike so it was developed to be used in trails possibly in the forest. Am I wrong? Anyways what is certain is that if your bike is sold on the market some people will use it to ride in an urban environment as well. Some others might also get to the forest riding the bike, using the city streets. What I have learned from the input I received from the young women I mentioned earlier is that it’s very difficult for car drivers to see people riding hand bikes and recumbent bikes even when the riders have flags. She told me the story of one of her friends who is also paraplegic and who was hit twice by cars. He even had to be hospitalised. That is why I believe visibility is a very serious issue which has to be highly considered. Let me know if you have found a solution on this matter.
    Thirdly, she also told me that although she was autonomous in her travels when she uses her wheel chair she is not when using her hand bike. The reason for that is that she cannot reach the straps to attach her legs because of the crank set which is in the way. Of course attaching your legs when your paraplegic is very important since sometimes you can get spasms and your legs can then come out of the foot rest and cause severe injuries. To say it short, your Crank set should be able to be moved out of the way while its users are preparing for their ride. Then again the three points I just mentioned are based on information I gathered from only one user but can she be the only one in this situation? I really doubt it.
    The fourth point I would like to bring to light is about winter. In 2010, Dave Gooch who has been in the bike business for 35 years said in an article published on the web: “winter biking has grown steadily more popular over the years, especially in the last decade”(1). I can’t imagine how popular winter biking might be 3 years later. I also did an internship this summer in an industrial design Bike frame company called Faction Bike Studio and I was told that winter bikes were a thing right now. If that is true then perhaps you should consider the possibility of having accessories adapted for winter. I think the most important thing to consider is how to prevent the chain and the gears from rusting due to snow and salt. Perhaps a chain guard or a belt drive system which doesn’t require lubrication, doesn’t make noise, lasts longer than an ordinary chain and of course doesn’t rust. Just that change to your design might be enough to allow people to keep practicing their favorite sport even in winter.
    In conclusion, I believe that the four issues I just mentioned which are Customization, visibility, winter and autonomy must be taken in account when developing a hand bike. I hope the information I just shared will be of use to you and I hope you will send me some feedback. Of course you can chose to take it or leave it since I’m only a student and I’ve only started on the subject. For my part I will continue my research and I hope to develop for my final year’s project something as visually stunning as your hand bike, although my bike design will probably be more focused on travelling in the city.

    (1) TheUniter, (2010), “Winter biking rises in popularity” The Official Student Newspaper of The University of Winnipeg, http://uniter.ca/view/winter-biking-rises-in-popularity, consulted on September 24 2013.

    • Marius Hjelmervik October 8, 2013 at 6:55 am -  Reply

      Hi Loïc,

      Thank you for the comment. It’s always nice to have more people in the work of making the life easier for everyone!

      Your concerns are very accurate and as you mention, my design does not fit everyone. I started out with a bike that had a lot more adjustment possibilities, and that would also “open up” for easier entry and exit, but the feedback I got from the users made me focus on making the best offroad handbike possible even though that excluded some users. I do not think it will be possible to make a design that fits EVERYONE without compromising on the ride experience and rigidity of the frame. Not to mention weight. Being a recumbent setup with great back support like this, already includes a larger usergroup than i.e. the one-off handbike where you have to have mobility in your entire upper body. That being said, there are more adjustment possibilities in the design, than the renderings show. The handcrank, seat, lower leg support and footrest are all adjustable to some degree, and should accommodate most “normal” body types. The young woman you describe would, as you mention, have a hard time with my design, but then again, she would (unfortunate as it might be) not be the in the targetgroup for this bike.

      I have focused on making a great bike for many, instead of a average bike for everyone.

      I have not taken into account urban visibility or snow riding at this point.

      As mentioned, I would recommend focusing on making a awesome product that solves some issues to perfection, instead of making a general product that only barely solves all issues. Personally I don’t think it is possible to make the “perfect handbike” fit for all conditions, and all users. I would rather make two different bikes…

      Good luck with your project!

      • Jeff October 8, 2013 at 7:21 pm -  Reply

        I agree totally Marius! Even though inclusion is a good thing there are allot of people looking for exactly what you have designed. I have put off buying other designs already on the market to wait on yours because it is what I’ve envisioned for years but didn’t have the design experience to make it happen. Keep trying to get sponsors because we’re ready to shred some trails!

        • Scott October 12, 2013 at 1:12 pm -  Reply

          Marius, this sounds great. I really look forward to seeing what you’ve come up with.

          Jeff, take a look at the Nuke offroad handcycle from ReActive Adaptations. I commented in this discussion back in ’11 as my Nuke was being built; lots of riders have found new opportunities in the mountains since then.

          http://www.reactiveadaptations.com/

          https://www.facebook.com/pages/ReActive-Adaptations/122771857782758

          As for urban visibility, I don’t ride streets too often, but have lights front & rear that are easily visible. Snow riding can be done with fat tires (~4″ wide). Jake O’Connor, the builder, can accommodate such a request – his shop is in Colorado in a location that gets hundreds of inches of snowfall every year, and he’s done it before.

  29. Nick November 13, 2013 at 12:32 pm -  Reply

    Hi Marius. Im really interested in your bike. If the production version isnt available could i pay you to use the schematic to build one myself? Im a quadriplegic with no finger movement and i cant push wrists down, however i can pull them up. will the bike work for me? Thanks

    • Marius Hjelmervik November 14, 2013 at 3:02 am -  Reply

      Hi Nick,
      Thanks for the interest. I would be more than happy to provide schematics. Send me an e-mail at marius(a)hjelmervik.dk and we can take it from there. Regarding the wrist movement, I honestly don’t know, but send me an e-mail and we can most likely figure something out.

  30. Dan November 23, 2013 at 7:07 pm -  Reply

    Hi Marius,
    Do you have a blog or website where we can see the progress with your bike? I know it’s taking a long time to get it to market, but please don’t give up! This is the best design for an off-road handcycle for me that I’ve seen, and believe me, I’ve looked. You will be filling a void in what’s currently on the market. You should be able to do serious off-roading with this without having to stare at the dirt the whole time. I’ve been watching this page for a year and a half, hoping to get one. I’d love to see a picture of your prototype. Thanks for the hard work, I really hope it pays off.

    • Marius Hjelmervik December 12, 2013 at 8:13 am -  Reply

      Hi Dan,
      Thank you for the kind words. Yes, this is taking way longer than I had imagined and hoped, but I get ever closer, even though the steps are small. I will be moving in a few months, and I then hope to be able to work more on it, and find a workshop closer to where I live The next steps . There is only so much I can do with pen and paper (and 3D CAD) :-)

      • Steve D February 19, 2014 at 5:18 am -  Reply

        great design Marius. I’m a quadraplegic from the UK and I’d love one of these! I think it is much better, for me anyway, than a full recumbent bike, easier to get in and out of and probably a better turning circle than a recumbent single front wheel type.

        I run a company selling disability products and would love to get the bike into the UK when you are ready and if you’d be interested. http://www.spokz.co.uk

        Good luck with it all, Steve

  31. Mindy February 20, 2014 at 1:58 pm -  Reply

    Hi Marius,
    I’ve been in a wheelchair my entire life, and I’ve never even thought of being able to do mountain climbing, or bike climbing? lol. I’ve been looking at handcycles for years and have yet to buy one. They’re so expensive and not easily attainable for the general public.

    I just came across this post last night and immediately loved your concept. I love the high back, which most don’t have, and it’s exactly what I’d need. I can’t wait for you to finally be able to produce this bike…it’s what I’ve been looking for :)

  32. Dennis May 1, 2014 at 1:15 pm -  Reply

    Hi Marius

    what abour your project ? is it possible to buy one now ,
    It’s time to me to buy a new handbike for off road, and you are in my short list… But i need a new one for this summer… So what is the progress in your project to build this handbie ,
    thanks for your answer

    Dennis

  33. Debbie Ludgate May 2, 2014 at 9:33 pm -  Reply

    Hi Marius,
    I’m really really intrested in your handcycle and your white & purple one I believe would work awesome for me. Are they on the market….and where can I get one and how much??

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

   
 
Competitive Cyclist - Santa Cruz  
california flag t-shirt  
 
 
Bicycle Design Merchandise=