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InCog multi-tool and more

InCOG is an “out of sight” multi-tool that was created by Industrial designer Joshua Brassé, Founder and CEO of Ideacious. The tool fits neatly inside the bike’s handlebar, and is flexible so that it works with standard drop bars as well as various other bends. The exposed end-cap is designed with a recessed star pattern, which mates with the included flat removal tool. The standard bits inside can be replaced at your local hardware store if they are lost or need to be customized.  Get more information and see additional images at Ideacious.

Yanko Design posts some crazy concepts from time to time, but this bike locating lock by designers Yakun Zhang, Jason Liu, & Danwei Ye seems like a pretty sensible idea. Much like the remote fob on a set of car keys, this lock features a radio transmitter in the key that communicates with a matched receiver in the lock. Press a button on the key and the lock lights up and makes a sound. I have never had any trouble finding my bike here in the US, but I did have a bit of a challenge finding a rental bike among the many bikes parked on the street in Amsterdam once. Something like this would have come in pretty handy in that situation.

Finally, I can’t post without mentioning Road.cc’s  video of Graeme Obree explaining the design and construction of a prone position bike that he’ll be using for an attempt at the human-powered land speed record in September. The Flying Scotsman is definitely an interesting guy (and a “bit of a mad genius” as one of the commenters pointed out), so I definitely suggest you check out the link.

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13 Responses

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  1. Andy says

    The incog is a neat idea, but it’s hard enough to torque some bolts with a small multi tool as it is, so I’m not sure how well turning a little knob would work without having something perpendicular to help torque it. I can imagine that tightening a brake cable, for instance, would be sketchy at best with this tool.

    Congrats on Yanko for a design worthy of making with that bike lock. I, too, don’t personally have a need for those features. But I have coordinated a bike valet parking coral with ~200 bikes, and it can sure be tough to spot a bike in a pile that size. I’ve seen those Dutch bike garages that hold tens of thousands of bike, where this would be a great tool (though I hear they often just use rear wheel locks rather than securing the bike to a post as we typically do in the US).

    I saw Obree’s movie a few years ago and loved it. I can’t wait to hear more about his progress and see some videos of the new bike in action.

  2. Wei says

    Andy, are you familiar with the proper torque specs for bike parts? All of the adjustments that you will be performing on the road (yes, even brake cable pinch bolts) involve less than 10 Nm. More than that and you’re likely over-tightening…which is just about the worst thing you can do to a bike besides crash it. Only major stuff like BB cups, cassette lockrings, etc will require significantly more torque, and you’re gonna be using shop tools for that anyway (or paying someone to do it).

    See this http://bicycletutor.com/torque-specifications/

    • Andy says

      Yep. I have a socket set with allen bits that looks to be about the same width as the pieces shown here. A brake cable might be possible but difficult to tighten enough. A seatpost or pedal would be impossible with finger strength alone to turn an allen key attached to something narrow enough to fit in the handlebars. I see they one an angled allen to help with that, but it still looks like it’s not a big help.

      • Joshua Brassé says

        Thanks for your feedback guys. We will be conducting extensive prototyping and testing as the product approaches the preorder goal and ramps up to production. The Elbow+Extender currently included in the kit is intended to provide the extra torque you would need when you’re dealing with brake mounts and the stem clamp etc.

        As we go through the testing we may find it necessary to modify the elbow tool or include a right angle connector in addition to it.

  3. Victor Ragusila says

    Related to Obree’s bike, the teardrop shape is not the best shape. Also, everyone builds bikes custom to the rider for this competition…

    Hope he will show up. I am really curious what speed he can hit with it. The builder who makes the fastest bike is a sculptor. The second fastest team is a very high tech team from Netherlands, with Olympic riders. It will be an interesting comparison.

    Victor

  4. Max Power says

    I don’t really understand the value of stowing my tools in the handlebars if I still need to carry a tool to extract them.

    • Joshua Brassé says

      The unique key was one of the things we went back and forth on for sometime – while it does offer a tamper-resistant solution, it runs counter to the idea of not having to carry anything additional in your pockets/bag.

      When the product goes into production we may offer both options (unique key and just a simple coin slot solution).

      • art says

        Have you thought about collaborating with a lock manufacturer to bundle this with a U lock and use the same key for both?

        • Joshua Brassé says

          That’s a great idea, and right up our alley. The flexibility of the ideacious platform really opens up the opportunity to collaborate with other companies – we’ll be sure to look into it (for the next iteration of the product, if not this one)

  5. wave says

    For integrated multi-tool, I like the Pedro’s Tulio :
    http://reviews.mtbr.com/pedros-tutto-and-tulio-multi-tools/tulio

  6. Kimmo says

    Bwaaahahahahahahah

    Graeme Obree: my kinda guy.

Continuing the Discussion

  1. Bicycle Design | InCOG by Joshua Brassé | ideacious media linked to this post on June 1, 2012

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