Lots of unrelated links

Electric bike, Miscellaneous 4 77

“The Beast” by M55 Bikes is an aggressive looking pedelec with a claimed 40 mph max speed. I think this is one of those electric bikes that begs the question, how fast is too fast? Isn’t this really just a motorcycle with pedals?

Also recently posted at Yanko Design, re:energy is a front wheel concept that promises to harness kinetic energy from riding. The idea behind the design by Jinsik Kim and Boseung Seo is that a user can recharge his or her laptop, phone, or other gadget with the energy stored in the wheel. Maybe in a world with no crosswinds, but in real life it is not very practical. I certainly wouldn’t want to get passed by a bus while riding a bike with a disc wheel in the front. Ouch!

Yet another bike seen at Yanko Design is Omer Sagiv’s folding city bike made from recyclable molded plastic. The full suspension, singlespeed ‘ReCycle Me’ was one of the shortlisted entries in the Seoul Cycle Design Competition. You might remember that I posted a few other concept designs by Omer Sagiv a few months ago.

Speaking of molded plastic bikes, check out the Bisickle, a “whimsical” commuter bike concept by illustrator/inventor/cartoonist Steven Johnson.

I’m really liking the illustrations by Chris McNally on the new Ibis website.

PUBLIC bike has couple of new models that will debut this month. Tell them in ~200 words or less where you would take them and what you would do on a 90 minute bicycle trip in your hometown, and you might win one of the new bikes.

Every other blog in the world has mentioned this, so I might as well quit holding out and jump on the bandwagon. I am skeptical about the idea, but I have to admit that I did find it initially interesting (maybe it was just the models and photography that drew me in).  I can’t wait to see how this product is received when Hövding actually starts selling it in Sweden, possibly as early as next Spring.

Pedalr is a site where you can buy or sell bicycles, parts, accessories, apparel or anything bike related. Unlike Craigslist and eBay, pedalr gives “artisans, boutique manufacturers and small shops of the biking world a platform to create identity and connect with bicycle passionate folks.” Read more about it here and click around a bit. It is a pretty cool site to explore.

Alastair Warren wasn’t happy with existing mini-pumps on the market, so he designed one that he believes will offer a better user experience.

I liked the Eurobike Student award winning design for a tent that used a bicycle as part of the structure. Apparently, Topeak has a similar tent on the market.

Apple’s “smart bicycle” patent was making the blog rounds not long ago (including on this blog). Yannig Roth shared some interesting thoughts on the subject, with a mention of the Smart e-bike, recently on his blog.

Alchemy Goods is a Seattle based company that makes bags and other products from old bicycle tubes, seatbelts, advertising banners, etc. They just released a few new products including the Pine messenger bag (for smaller loads), which you can see pictured here.

Bike198 is introducing a new t-shirt line starting with this “Size Does Matter” 29er shirt. Robb Sutton of Bike198 says, “The design of this tee by Adam Allen gets to the retro roots that started with custom steel 29ers but still speaks to the aluminum full suspension designs that we see in today’s market.” They are offering the shirt at a discounting rate until 11/13, so check out the pre-order page.

Richard from Cyclelicious attended the 2010 San Francisco Bicycle Expo last week. Check out some of his photos, including those from the Pedal Savvy bicycle fashion show that took place during the expo.

Salvatore Avantaggiato from Valgioie, Italy is the designer behind the oONDA. Check out the website (in Italian) to see a video of this unconventional folding bike

On a trip to Italy to visit his wife’s family, Brian Miller visited the Gemmati Velocipedi factory, which has been producing Iride bikes since 1919. Over the years, he visited many times and finally decided to start importing the classic steel lugged Iride bikes to the U.S. The deep-drop pantographed stem on the track bike, caught my attention. I still have a few old pantographed 1980’s Italian parts that I no longer use, but I just can’t bear to part with.

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4 Comments

  1. Mick Allan November 10, 2010 at 4:30 am -  Reply

    Strap an old starter motor to a bike with a regular car battery and it’ll carry a rider at 40mph (for an hour) It’s not rocket science.’The Beast’ is appropriately named. How high is that bottom bracket? The trouble with using DH geometry as a design starting point is that it leaves the bike with an impossible to resolve compromise – difficult to pedal or too tall to get on. This isn’t the first designer to make such a gaffe. And it wont be the last. Other niggles include the extra high rear suspension pivot point and that ridiculously high top tube. A triumph of style over content, with flaws like that I wouldn’t trust that they’d got the fundamentals right. .

  2. mommus November 17, 2010 at 1:36 pm -  Reply

    that oONDA bike looks a bit odd. When folded it doesn’t look that different from a Brompton, but unfolded it looks a bit ungainly. Does it have stabilisers or something?
    The Beast looks mental… but would be pretty awesome fun!

  3. John Jairo Baena November 25, 2014 at 10:57 am -  Reply

    La bicicleta es el mejor medio de movilidad que hace al ser humano sensible por la ecología

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