Comments on: Cerevellum http://bicycledesign.net/2010/08/cerevellum-2/ The blog about industrial design in the bike industry Thu, 15 Jan 2015 22:52:18 +0000 hourly 1 By: Ross Nicholson http://bicycledesign.net/2010/08/cerevellum-2/comment-page-1/#comment-25062 Thu, 03 Nov 2011 16:42:12 +0000 http://bicycledesign.net/?p=1384#comment-25062 Unfortunately, this venture has suffered delays. Deposits were taken, full refunds promised and, at this date, my deposit has not been returned.

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By: Susan http://bicycledesign.net/2010/08/cerevellum-2/comment-page-1/#comment-25058 Thu, 03 Nov 2011 06:48:53 +0000 http://bicycledesign.net/?p=1384#comment-25058 I think it’s a great idea. I don’t use a mirror because after a certain age the eye doesn’t shift focus from far to near very quickly, and looking at a helmet-mounted mirror long enough for that focus adjustment to occur takes attention away from the road in front for too long. As a middle-aged rider, I love the idea of rear camera view being displayed on small bar-mounted computer….ideally integrated with other cycling computer functions.

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By: JR http://bicycledesign.net/2010/08/cerevellum-2/comment-page-1/#comment-23553 Sat, 23 Apr 2011 22:53:40 +0000 http://bicycledesign.net/?p=1384#comment-23553 Think you need to develop market to Burley et al: all those families with bike trailers pulling kids that never can be seen. Cut me in on the idea!!
Austin Texas

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By: Doug http://bicycledesign.net/2010/08/cerevellum-2/comment-page-1/#comment-11765 Tue, 07 Sep 2010 02:53:08 +0000 http://bicycledesign.net/?p=1384#comment-11765 This would be good on my tandem. The extra rider behind you makes it that much more challenging to keep track of traffic approaching from the rear.

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By: James T http://bicycledesign.net/2010/08/cerevellum-2/comment-page-1/#comment-10924 Tue, 24 Aug 2010 12:58:48 +0000 http://bicycledesign.net/?p=1384#comment-10924 Sometimes emails get lost in the shuffle, especially when you are working on many different things. Why don’t you send him another one? I know Evan outside of this project, and he really is a nice guy.

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By: Ron http://bicycledesign.net/2010/08/cerevellum-2/comment-page-1/#comment-10901 Tue, 24 Aug 2010 01:24:10 +0000 http://bicycledesign.net/?p=1384#comment-10901 Evan Solida lost a bit of my respect. I approached him with an email and he doesn’t respond even after a month. He’s quick to email you with requests for idea promotion though.

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By: Globramma Fujanna http://bicycledesign.net/2010/08/cerevellum-2/comment-page-1/#comment-10486 Wed, 18 Aug 2010 06:16:43 +0000 http://bicycledesign.net/?p=1384#comment-10486 Agree with above posters who say this is a solution looking for the wrong problem. For the rider to see behind them while on a bicycle, they need to do one of two things: turn head, or use a mirror.

What this product OUGHT to be, that would sell by the hundreds of thousands of units:

Bicycle CRASH camera, capable of capturing license plate clearly in many or most situations, and designed to produce evidence admissible in court. f

Camera specs:
– High-resolution (5.0MP?), low-frame rate (10FPS?), high shutter speed (1/500th sec? to negate road vibration) camera with upper infra-red spectrum sensitivity and a quality glass wide-angle lens, with a powerful (3-to-5-watt) pulsed IR LED source that pulses in sync with the camera shutter every 5th frame to illuminate a car’s license plate (by retro-reflection) day or night. Continuously-looping flash-RAM-based storage that captures the last 120 seconds of footage. Sensitive 3-axis accelerometer coupled with intelligent signal processing to detect a crash and then stop recording 1 minute AFTER the crash event. That way, there would be 60 seconds of footage both before and after the crash. Date & time stamp on each frame of video from internal, factory-set (to UTC) quartz real-time clock accurate to +/- 60 seconds in 10 years. (or better,) backed up by a lithium coin-cell battery to keep clock running even if main battery is completely discharged.

Casing / physical design
Casing should be fiber-reinforced resin, completely sealed, IP67 waterproof, with a very scratch-resistant camera lens housing. Mounting should be easy on any tubular part of the bike frame, including front forks, and camera unit should be clip-on/clip-off removable so it can be easily taken off in theft-prone environments. The flash-ram portion of the unit should be in a mini-vault (think aircraft CVR) that can stand the crush force of a tractor-trailer tire or the deceleration shock of a 60MPH impact against a 1″ thick steel plate.

The unit should be designed with a courtroom setting in mind, i.e. for data integrity. As such it should be uni-directional in data transfer, to make it impossible to alter the contents of its internal storage. Any time it’s set on its custom inductive charging base it should automatically begin sending out (in a continuous loop) the contents of the flash RAM, via a very low power (again, inductive-loop, perhaps high-speed RS232?), very-short-range wireless method, encrypted with a key that is unique to its charging base, so only the owner (or the manufacturer, if requested) can decrypt the video.
Video format should be an open-source standard, not microsoft WMV or Adobe Flash. Perhaps MPEG4?

Camera power-up and power-down should be auto-controlled by the 3-axis accelerometer, i.e. power-on when motion is detected, power-down into sleep mode 10 minutes after last movement is detected. Size and weight should be commensurate with a fully-operational battery life of 12 hours, and a sleep mode of 30 days or more.

User Interface
One or more LEDs deeply buried in the casing, or situated behind the transparent lens covering, would provide status information to the user: Power-on or sleep status, and whether the unit had been “tripped” into accident mode where recording has stopped. As unit could be tripped by false alarms such as dropping it on a table or similar situations, it should be easily resettable by a sequence of shaking motions which the accelerometers would detect and then use to reset the unit. –> the reset shake sequence should be carefully designed to be easy to use, but complex enough that it could never be tripped by random motion. For example, it should incorporate time delays as well as directional acceleration inputs. (“Shake 3 times down, wait 1 to 2 seconds, shake up-down-up-down, wait 1 to 2 seconds, shake left-right-left, wait 1 second, tap lightly on surface.”)

I’d pay at least $150 to $250 for a unit like the one I’ve described above. I’d probably buy 2, one for front and one for back. (What about the sides? Well, in another decade technology will permit have 4 tiny high res cameras mounted in a 360-degree pod atop one’s helmet…)

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By: 自転車に乗るインセンティブ « cotoba http://bicycledesign.net/2010/08/cerevellum-2/comment-page-1/#comment-10320 Mon, 16 Aug 2010 14:18:46 +0000 http://bicycledesign.net/?p=1384#comment-10320 […] 【後ろを見たい】 「後方を見たいインセンティブ」は、自転車乗りにとって夢にも出る呪文だ。『Cerevellum』はハンドルに装着する電子リアビューモニター。 […]

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By: Ron http://bicycledesign.net/2010/08/cerevellum-2/comment-page-1/#comment-9673 Wed, 11 Aug 2010 00:31:59 +0000 http://bicycledesign.net/?p=1384#comment-9673 Evan needs to branch out this idea from bicycles to other vehicles. I see lots more potential in other areas.

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By: Aarn Tate http://bicycledesign.net/2010/08/cerevellum-2/comment-page-1/#comment-9540 Mon, 09 Aug 2010 20:30:13 +0000 http://bicycledesign.net/?p=1384#comment-9540 This is the solution to a problem for streamliners and velomobiles. Mirrors greatly increase drag and a camera rear view system can be integrated cleanly into the aerodynamic shekll without adding drag.

Just what I have been looking for!

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