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Cube urban bike concept

I hope everyone had a great New Year. It certainly felt like January here in Greenville this morning. I guess I am a fair weather bike commuter because I usually just drive to work on cold days. This morning though, I rode despite temps in the 20s. By the time I got to work, my face was numb and my hair was frozen, but it was still a fun ride in. Tonight’s lows are going to be in the teens (pretty cold for South Carolina), so I’ll see if I can keep the commuting streak going.

Anyway, back to design content. Over the holidays I noticed an incoming link from a blog that I had never seen before called Hubstripping. It is worth checking out if you haven’t already seen it. A recent post showed the Urban Concept Bike, pictured here, from German bicycle manufacturer Cube. The bike was designed by Gregor Dauth, a student at the University Coburg/Germany, and features an internally geared 8-speed hub and a fully enclosed drivetrain. You can read about more of the features of this concept bike at the Hubstripping post.

Also over the holidays, I noticed that MocoLoco posted a few new limited edition versions of the Puma/Biomega bikes. From drop bars on one to BMX bars and mags on another, it looks like Puma is trying to capitalize on the “fixed gear freestyler trend”. Yeah I know these aren’t really fixed, but the pink and green ones certainly have that hipster fixie look.

Speaking of hipster fixies, the latest issue of ID magazine mentioned these rust and scratch stickers from designer Dominic Wilcox. In the ID article, the stickers are shown on a Bianchi Pista (no surprise there) and are referred to as an ingenious theft deterrent. I don’t know about the stickers, but the angled down drop bars would be enough to scare me away from the bike pictured in the magazine. While you are at it, check out some of Dominic’s other work. After you see the Orgasmatron 3000 or the on/off switch on his head, you will know not to take the rust stickers too seriously.

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8 Responses

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  1. ~ FredPC ~ the PDA Junkie says

    NuVinci (da Vinci) Transmission
    http://www.popsci.com/popsci/flat/bown/2007/recreation/item_98.html#=rss
    Have you seen this developement? It’s featured by Popular Science magazine and won their Grand Award for their innovative infinity transmission design: “Based on a 1490s sketch by Leonardo da Vinci, The Ride’s rear hub mimics an infinite number of gears, rather than the mere 21 offered by the usual chain-yanking transmission. So you can always find the perfect gear ratio, whether starting from a stop or speeding down a hill.”

  2. eradler says

    Have you ever lifted the Batavus or Sparta bicycle equipped with the NuVinci transmission?
    I find it to heavy.

  3. James says

    Yeah, from what I have heard, weight is the main drawback for the NuVinci hub. It weighs close to 10 pounds (including the freewheel), which is about 3 times what a Nexus hub weighs. Still, considering the target market, I don’t think the weight is that big an issue. Sure it will be nice if Fallbrook can get the weight down a little, but I expect some weight penalty for an infinitely variable transmission system.

    Though it does make for a heavy bike, I think the NuVinci system looks promising. I would love to ride a bike equipped with it to see for myself.

  4. 54 says

    When are those design students going to realize that the rider will have some serious pain getting off these bikes, if you run a horizontal seat-post/top-tube so high.

  5. bikesgonewild says

    …lemme see if i can remember the sequence properly…
    …hey, that cube bike looks like an allsop — zipp — trek — lemond from years ago…to be honest i kinda like the look but *54* makes a good point…all but experienced riders would have problems & even then…

    …nu-vinci == landrider bike, anyone ???…

    …dominic wilcox’s artwork definitely deserves a perusal as he’s quite interesting & clever…regarding those stickers, though…my beat up old single speed campy & modolo equipped towny has plenty a’ chipped paint & real rust but still draws attention & compliments every time we ride together…don’t think those stickers would do much deterring on one a’ my good bikes, around here…

  6. Driver says

    William Gibson features fake rust and other more sci-fi bicycle anti-theft measures in his 1994 novel Virtual Light. Quite a good read one of the main protagonists is a SF courier.

  7. Ron says

    Looks so much like a SoftRide!

  8. Suparna says

    Really great article, thank you for sharing with us.



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